Biology 1065, Fall 2013

                           Fall Migration          

Instructors:  Richard Koval and Dr. Jerry Skinner, Capwell Hall 108; phone: 945-8404; jerry.skinner@keystone.edu

Required Texts:

          Peterson, Roger T. 1980. Peterson Field Guides to Eastern Birds, Houghton Mifflin, 380 pp. ISBN 039526619X

Class Meetings: Wednesday 9-12 in Capwell 202;  occasional trips may take place at other arranged times.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand the ideology of bird migration  

2. Be able to identify migratory hawks and waterfowl by profile, flight patterns and visual characteristics.

3. Understand methods of aerial transportation of raptors by use of thermal currents and deflective currents.

4. Be familiar with migratory birds and habitat associations.

5. Be able to identify migratory birds species by use of reference guides.

TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE:

Date

Topic

Assignment due for next class

4-Sep

Bird migration; raptor identification; overview of site visits

Review of newspaper article on broad-winged hawks

11-Sep

Field trip to Tunkhannock Riverfront Park and Lake Carey

List of migratory species possibly found in region

15-Sep

(SUNDAY) Field trip to Council Cup Hawk Watch Site

 

18-Sep

Field trip to Vosburg Neck

Final Exam review

25-Sep

Final Exam

 

Course Handouts

FIELD TRIPS: Come prepared to be outside for the entire class, rain or shine. Dress accordingly for weather conditions. Field trips will include river corridors, wetland borders, lakes, forests and exposed cliffs. Personal binoculars are highly recommended, however, Dr Skinner will have a few pairs on loan.

COURSE FORMAT

An introductory PowerPoint program will illustrates how to identify  hawks and waterfowl that will be observed in our region. The program will also detail geographic corridors and ridge tops as well as regional water bodies that are important refuge areas for migratory waterfowl.

FIELD EXERCISES

The field exercises will be fun, exciting and educational.  Students will visit lakes and rivers to conduct waterfowl identification on specific individuals.  Migratory hawk observations will take place at Council Cup Hawk Watch Site near Berwick,  as well as the Vosburg Neck along the Susquehanna River. There might be times when we will spend more than 3 hours at a location, so bring a packed lunch and water. The unpredictable nature of field biology means that results may vary based upon weather conditions. We will be conducting field trips on exposed mountain ridges, so embrace for windy, cool weather and dress according for these conditions

QUIZZES

Students will be graded on participation, field ethics, work assignment and a final exam including species identification , reasons for bird migration, preferred migratory habitats and geographic formations.

EVALUATION:

Assignment

25

Final Exam

100

Instructor's subjective evaluation

25

TOTAL

150